St Illtud's Galilee Chapel, St Illtud's Church, Llantwit Major

News

Royal Visit

Saturday, July 5th, 2014

Royal Visit
Hundreds of people lined the streets of Llantwit Major on 1st July 2014 to welcome HRH The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall on their visit to the town’s Galilee Chapel.
Pics: Charles, Camilla
The Royal visitors chatted to members of the public, including flag waving school children, as they walked from the town Square to St Illtud’s Church in brilliant sunshine on the second day of their Welsh summer visit.
Pic: Charles and Camilla
They were greeted at the church by the Rector of Llantwit Major, the Revd Huw Butler, who gave a brief introduction to the Galilee Chapel Project.
Pic: royal couple greeted
During the visit, the Prince and Duchess met several of the parishioners, local schoolchildren and those involved with the project. They included:
- Parishioner Gladys Kilby, 94, the oldest member of the church who cut the ribbon to officially open the chapel during a celebration weekend last November.
- Lee Mayes, the Construction Site Manager, who enjoyed working on the church renovation project so much that he had a lasting reminder tattooed on his arm – in the form of Celtic crosses.
Mr Butler said, “History was made today because as far as we know this is the first ever Royal visit to this church. We are all thrilled that his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall have made a special visit to the Galilee Chapel.
“It was such a beautiful day. The Prince was very interested in the history of the stones. Thanks to the restoration project they are now being displayed properly and have been placed so that visitors can walk all around them to see them from all angles.”
Pic: 1459190_10152130650829131_1318977283_n
Following prayers and a Bible reading, the St Illtud’s Church Choir led the hymn singing before the Royal party were shown around the Chapel by the Rector, accompanied by the architect Michael Davies and Gareth Kiddie, the Interpretation and Activities co-ordinator. The Royal couple enjoyed a cup of tea on the mezzanine floor before signing the visitors’ book.
Pic: visitor book
In the garden outside a Magnolia tree was planted by the Prince and watered by the Duchess. Local Sunday schoolchildren looking on were told by the Prince to ensure they kept the tree well watered.
Pic: magnolia tree
Before leaving the Prince and Duchess were presented with gifts which included a framed montage of pictures of the church by Reader Keith Brown, a town shield from the town mayor Michael Mason and a basket of local produce including bara brith from Creative Rural Communities presented by local baker Mel Constantino.
More pictures of visit: http://llandaff.churchinwales.org.uk/news/2014/07/more-pictures-of-royal-visit-to-llantwit-major/
ITV news coverage: http://www.itv.com/news/wales/story/2014-06-30/prince-of-wales-starts-summer-tour-in-west-wales/

Hundreds of people lined the streets of Llantwit Major on 1st July 2014 to welcome HRH The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall on their visit to the Galilee Chapel.

The Royal visitors chatted to members of the public, including flag waving school children, as they walked from the town Square to St Illtud’s Church in brilliant sunshine on the second day of their Welsh summer visit.

They were greeted at the church by the Rector of Llantwit Major, the Revd Huw Butler, who gave a brief introduction to the Galilee Chapel Project.

During the visit, the Prince and Duchess met several of the parishioners, local schoolchildren and those involved with the project. They included:

  • Parishioner Gladys Kilby, 94, the oldest member of the church who cut the ribbon to officially open the chapel during a celebration weekend last November.
  • Lee Mayes, the Construction Site Manager, who enjoyed working on the church renovation project so much that he had a lasting reminder tattooed on his arm – in the form of Celtic crosses.

Mr Butler said, “History was made today because as far as we know this is the first ever Royal visit to this church. We are all thrilled that his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall have made a special visit to the Galilee Chapel.

“It was such a beautiful day. The Prince was very interested in the history of the stones. Thanks to the restoration project they are now being displayed properly and have been placed so that visitors can walk all around them to see them from all angles.”

Following prayers and a Bible reading, the St Illtud’s Church Choir led the hymn singing before the Royal party were shown around the Chapel by the Rector, accompanied by the architect Michael Davies and Gareth Kiddie, the Interpretation and Activities co-ordinator. The Royal couple enjoyed a cup of tea on the mezzanine floor before signing the visitors’ book.

In the garden outside a Magnolia tree was planted by the Prince and watered by the Duchess. Local Sunday schoolchildren looking on were told by the Prince to ensure they kept the tree well watered.

Before leaving the Prince and Duchess were presented with gifts which included a framed montage of pictures of the church by Reader Keith Brown, a town shield from the town mayor Michael Mason and a basket of local produce including bara brith from Creative Rural Communities presented by local baker Mel Constantino.

More pictures of visit

ITV news coverage

Architecture Award

Saturday, July 5th, 2014

Davies Sutton Architects has won the prestigious Welsh Architecture Award from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) for the conversion of the Galilee Chapel at St Illtud’s.
RIBA pic
The following excerpt, taken from the RIBA site, explains how the project has been a great contribution to British architecture:
Galilee Chapel is the realisation of a dream to restore a ruin which has remained in disrepair for over 400 years, and provide a suitable building to commemorate one of cradles of Celtic Christianity in Britain. Even this final solution has been years in gestation, but the patient result fulfils the brief superbly and provides the church with desperately needed space, a suitably reverent area in which to display the ancient Celtic stones and added facilities to give the church further space for its congregation and the local community.
The Chapel provides a new, well lit, calm and dignified stage to exhibit the stones, and also accommodates restrooms, a meeting/gallery space, a kitchen and an office. The constraints of the existing structure have been overcome by the architect through both following conservation principles and being innovative where required. The ruined side walls have been framed in stone and glazed extensively, allowing natural light to flood into the space. From the main body of the church this gives the chapel an almost celestial light through the internal glazed doors which draws visitors in.
Materials such as local stone, lime, natural slates, limewash, natural oak boarding and frameless glazing all give the Chapel a feeling of permanence and quality which allow it to sit well next the existing church, but not to hide its more contemporary detailing. The jury felt this was a confident solution to a difficult brief. Despite the restrictions imposed by the existing structure, the fact this is consecrated ground, disability access issues and archaeological concerns, the architect has produced a design of quality, and delivered a building which is well-detailed throughout and with no little panache. It shows a high level of maturity and confidence in terms of conservation design.
Pics from Nov

Davies Sutton Architects has won the prestigious Welsh Architecture Award from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) for the conversion of the Galilee Chapel at St Illtud’s.

RIBA

The following excerpt, taken from the RIBA site, explains how the project has been a great contribution to British architecture:

Galilee Chapel is the realisation of a dream to restore a ruin which has remained in disrepair for over 400 years, and provide a suitable building to commemorate one of cradles of Celtic Christianity in Britain. Even this final solution has been years in gestation, but the patient result fulfils the brief superbly and provides the church with desperately needed space, a suitably reverent area in which to display the ancient Celtic stones and added facilities to give the church further space for its congregation and the local community.

The Chapel provides a new, well lit, calm and dignified stage to exhibit the stones, and also accommodates restrooms, a meeting/gallery space, a kitchen and an office. The constraints of the existing structure have been overcome by the architect through both following conservation principles and being innovative where required. The ruined side walls have been framed in stone and glazed extensively, allowing natural light to flood into the space. From the main body of the church this gives the chapel an almost celestial light through the internal glazed doors which draws visitors in.

Materials such as local stone, lime, natural slates, limewash, natural oak boarding and frameless glazing all give the Chapel a feeling of permanence and quality which allow it to sit well next the existing church, but not to hide its more contemporary detailing. The jury felt this was a confident solution to a difficult brief. Despite the restrictions imposed by the existing structure, the fact this is consecrated ground, disability access issues and archaeological concerns, the architect has produced a design of quality, and delivered a building which is well-detailed throughout and with no little panache. It shows a high level of maturity and confidence in terms of conservation design.

View Photos of the completed Galilee Chapel

Photos of the Galilee Chapel at Llanilltud

Saturday, July 5th, 2014

Photographs courtesy of Michael Davies (Sutton Davies Architects)

Visiting Hours

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Llanilltud is open to visitors every day during daylight hours.  There are also Welcomers on duty on:

  • Wednesdays from 10am till Noon and from 2pm till 4 pm
  • Saturdays from 10am till Noon, and from 1pm till 5 pm

We look forward to your visit!

Opening Weekend – Photo Montage

Monday, December 16th, 2013

The document below portrays a montage of additional photos taken at the re-dedication and opening of the Galilee Chapel in November 2013, and also of the many musical performances kindly contributed by local musicians over that special weekend.

Opening Ceremony Photos

Musical Performances Photos

Llantwit Major School: Short Film

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Students of the Welsh Baccalaureate from Llantwit Major Comprehensive School have produced this short film from researching the project to restore the Galilee Chapel, and kindly made it available. The group was supervised by Leader of Learning, Rhiannon Carr. The film is a great example of how the project is making an positive impact on the local community.

View film

Video Tribute

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

Please follow the link to YouTube for a video tribute to the development of Llanilltud’s Galilee Chapel:

Galilee Chapel, Llaniltud

BBC Coverage

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

The BBC’s article on the opening of the Llanilltud Galilee Chapel can be seen here: Galilee Chapel reopens in Llantwit Major as home for Celtic crosses

Rededication of the Galilee Chapel

Monday, November 4th, 2013

The Galilee Chapel was rededicated at a service on 3rd November. Archdeacon Philip preached at the service, and a full copy of his sermon can be seen at this page: Sermon by the Venerable Philip Morris, Archdeacon of Margam.
In the photo below which was taken at the rededication, from left to right are: Archdeacon Philip, Huw Butler, Rector of Llantwit Major, Archbishop Barry and John  Webber, former Rector of Llantwit Major.

Galilee Chapel Opens!

Saturday, November 2nd, 2013

After 400 years of ruin, the restored Galilee Chapel finally opened today. The West Church of St Illtud’s was packed with expectant visitors awaiting the moment when the doors were opened into the Galilee Chapel. The opening ceremony was marked by a speech and prayer from the Rev Huw Butler, with the duty of cutting the ribbon being handed to Llantwit’s oldest resident, 94-year-old Gladys Kilby, in the presence of the youngest member of the community, Violet, just one day old!

The Celtic Stones